Is Brexit An Economic Suicide for Northern Ireland?

Is Brexit An Economic Suicide for Northern Ireland?

In a part of the United Kingdom that is often forgotten, a potential Brexit poses serious threats on the economy alongside with a historically ongoing political-religious conflict.   Easter Saturday, 2016 – A train gets stopped and vandalised in Newry, a small border town between the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland.   The train was completely stopped, for long enough that passengers had to switch to a bus instead. One of the passengers explained…

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The left behind

The left behind

  “Let’s get out. Out, out, out of that circus,” said people when asked about the EU as they enjoyed a Sunday stroll along the seaside in Clacton-on-sea, the place in all of UK where UKIP(UK Independence party) got their one MP from. And just 20 minutes walk further down the beach you reach Jaywick, the most deprived town in England. Though it is only a 2 hours drive from London it seems like another…

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Mostar – a city forever divided?

Mostar – a city forever divided?

Mostar, the most important city of the Herzegovina region of southern Bosnia-Herzegovina, has not had an election for 8 years. The gridlock makes it hard for the city to develop. Mostar takes pride in being the country’s most ethnically diverse city. Since the war, however, Mostar is a divided city. By David Helander Srđan Škoro takes a seat at his restaurant in Mostar and asks for a glass of juice. The place has a garden…

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In a state of political limbo

In a state of political limbo

Bosnia and Herzegovina is a country where the solution became problem. Two decades later, the peace agreement-turned-constitution from 1995 is still preventing post-war progress. In a state where almost half of the population is unemployed, it is clear that some kind of change is desperately needed. By Beata Thor The square outside The National Theatre in central Sarajevo has been named after Susan Sontag, the American writer, director and political activist. The sign indicating her…

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Italy Bleeding Minds

Italy Bleeding Minds

Imagine being raised in a modest home in the suburbs of Rome. Blessed with an outstanding level of intelligence and motivational drive you set your ambitious sights toward a career in medical research with the full moral and financial support of your family. You successfully gain entry to university and graduate many years later with a Masters degree. After a substantial period of time testing the job market you are faced with a blunt choice….

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The spring sun darkens the shadow of Babi Yar

The spring sun darkens the shadow of Babi Yar

One of the black metal crosses by the edge of the ravine The large Babi Yar Memorial Park in the north-west of Kiev is the site where thousands of people lost their lives in the second world war. Today it is a lively park. The park shows the contradiction of dealing with a grim history, while still looking forward. Joachim Jansen The unmistakable smell of salty meat on fire drifts through the trees in the…

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When free press is not so free

When free press is not so free

Journalists in Macedonia face an ethical fork in the road living in a corrupt media system. By Leah Sarnoff The hum of the morning’s local news broadcast plays behind the bar of a time-honored café outside the center of Skopje, Macedonia. Glancing to the television, only between dry bits of morning chatter, patrons watch the static image of their country’s progression and hear simple dialog on local matters. As the midday sun begins to shine…

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Macedonia’s battle over Alexander the Great

Macedonia’s battle over Alexander the Great

Hidden beneath the layers of the Greek-Macedonian name dispute is a larger disconnect that haunts both sides of the same coin – people’s words fall short from their actions. By Hannah Kaplan The view from above must be nice. Piercing the early morning layer of fog, the statue of Alexander the Great rises above the residents of Skopje, Macedonia, reminding them of their connection to a gloried past and the tension over who owns the right to…

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Fighting art with art: the battle for Skopje

Fighting art with art: the battle for Skopje

In the tug of war for Skopje’s identity, protest art is biting back.  By Yanita Georgieva When a giant orange pill appeared on one of Skopje’s biggest central boulevards last month, people were not shocked. The makeshift sculpture of the anti-depressant “Diazepam” was installed anonymously as a reminder that the country had a growing dependency on pills. The monument came with an explanation for people to pause and read: In case of urgent need, bite a…

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Ukraine’s western ambitions dealt blow as Dutch say ‘no’

Ukraine’s western ambitions dealt blow as Dutch say ‘no’

Maidan Nezalezhnosti (Independence Square) in the heart of Kiev where mass protests during the Revolution of Dignity in 2014 took place. By Aleisha Owen Since Ukraine’s 2014 revolution, a growing collection of young pro-Ukrainian voices have fostered a strong civil society that wants to see their country adopting more Western values as it slowly moves closer to Western Europe and the EU. However, an attempt to secure deeper economic ties with Europe was dealt a…

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