Mostar – a city forever divided?

Mostar – a city forever divided?

Mostar, the most important city of the Herzegovina region of southern Bosnia-Herzegovina, has not had an election for 8 years. The gridlock makes it hard for the city to develop. Mostar takes pride in being the country’s most ethnically diverse city. Since the war, however, Mostar is a divided city. By David Helander Srđan Škoro takes a seat at his restaurant in Mostar and asks for a glass of juice. The place has a garden…

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In a state of political limbo

In a state of political limbo

Bosnia and Herzegovina is a country where the solution became problem. Two decades later, the peace agreement-turned-constitution from 1995 is still preventing post-war progress. In a state where almost half of the population is unemployed, it is clear that some kind of change is desperately needed. By Beata Thor The square outside The National Theatre in central Sarajevo has been named after Susan Sontag, the American writer, director and political activist. The sign indicating her…

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A brief musical guide to Bosnia and Herzegovina

A brief musical guide to Bosnia and Herzegovina

The musical history of Bosnia and Herzegovina can’t be explained without going into the different cultures who have governed the country throughout history. In this video, however, we will take a look at how different types of music sound in the country today. Euroviews went to Mostar and sat down with Dragi Šestić, founder and producer of Mostar Sevdah Reunion, to have a chat about the distinction between sevdah and sevdalinka, what’s special about the Balkan Beat, and why…

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The spirit of Maidan is far from over

The spirit of Maidan is far from over

A woman wrapped herself in the Ukrainian flag. She is part of a protest against Oligarchs that refuse to give up their positions of power. By Tanya Falenczyk On a weekend, Kiev really comes alive. People stroll along the main boulevard that is lined with street venders and musicians, stop for a break in one of the many cafés or move uphill, towards the park with the nicest view. Sounds like any European capital. Except…

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Getting fat on a crisis: Ukraine unfastens the Bible-Belt

Getting fat on a crisis: Ukraine unfastens the Bible-Belt

By Bianca Benjamin Ukraine has a strong and enthusiastic Baptist community, whose humanitarian aid has been welcomed by the 1.4 million internal refugees in the country. As the amount of refugees continues to grow, the baptist church does too. People in crisis and churches looking to expand, have found each other with open arms.            

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When free press is not so free

When free press is not so free

Journalists in Macedonia face an ethical fork in the road living in a corrupt media system. By Leah Sarnoff The hum of the morning’s local news broadcast plays behind the bar of a time-honored café outside the center of Skopje, Macedonia. Glancing to the television, only between dry bits of morning chatter, patrons watch the static image of their country’s progression and hear simple dialog on local matters. As the midday sun begins to shine…

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Suspended justice the norm for Bosnian women

Suspended justice the norm for Bosnian women

*All identities of women in this article have been changed.  When walking around Sarajevo the sense of a patriarchal society is small, the men are courteous and the  women are respected but domestic violence affects 42% of women in Bosnia and Herzegovina, and only women are trying to combat this. By Jessica Henderson     “He had (a) restraining order but he would still approach me, and nothing. He was never punished” said Dina. Dina*…

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Macedonia’s battle over Alexander the Great

Macedonia’s battle over Alexander the Great

Hidden beneath the layers of the Greek-Macedonian name dispute is a larger disconnect that haunts both sides of the same coin – people’s words fall short from their actions. By Hannah Kaplan The view from above must be nice. Piercing the early morning layer of fog, the statue of Alexander the Great rises above the residents of Skopje, Macedonia, reminding them of their connection to a gloried past and the tension over who owns the right to…

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Fighting art with art: the battle for Skopje

Fighting art with art: the battle for Skopje

In the tug of war for Skopje’s identity, protest art is biting back.  By Yanita Georgieva When a giant orange pill appeared on one of Skopje’s biggest central boulevards last month, people were not shocked. The makeshift sculpture of the anti-depressant “Diazepam” was installed anonymously as a reminder that the country had a growing dependency on pills. The monument came with an explanation for people to pause and read: In case of urgent need, bite a…

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A glass of Scottish rebellion

A glass of Scottish rebellion

With the EU referendum around the corner, the question of what it means to be Scottish is once again talked-about. And the country of William Wallace, Loch Ness and last but not least Whisky, perhaps the country’s most potent symbol, may be a small country but a proud one too. Whisky floats in the veins of the Scotsmen and when the distillers call for a support to stay in the EU the Scotsmen listen. But…

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